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How To: Put Your Phone Down

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SHRIADITI KANCHERLA ’26
Sometimes it seems like our phones can take over our lives. What can we do to escape this reality and enjoy life fully?

New and evolving technology has enabled the world to modernize at a rapid pace. Phones are upgrading to become quicker and computers are processing information at capacities beyond comprehension. However, with the improvement of technology, screen addiction has tremendously increased, causing both adults and teenagers to be attached to our devices and unable to do simple tasks without having to bring our phones along.
The simplest way to avoid grabbing your device is to remove it from your sight. From my own experience, having a phone in my peripheral vision leads to a higher likelihood that the phone will be used. Unless in an emergency, your phone doesn’t always have to be on you at all times and can be put away in a nearby place that won’t catch your attention.
Technology has caused communication between people in real life to slowly dwindle over the years. Therefore, I would recommend trying to socialize with others in person as much as possible. Those people could be your family members, classmates, or even a nearby acquaintance. Having a conversation with the people around you would help you take your mind off of your phone and even make new connections that wouldn’t be possible with your phone tethered to you.

The world is not, in reality, centered on people’s online personalities. It revolves around the real world.


Reduced screen time can improve people’s mental health greatly. I have seen so many people around me who have been involved with technology to have more weakened mental states, myself included. Focusing on your screen doesn’t help you; it only makes you feel worse. Social media and other apps on the phone have caused my mental health to deteriorate over time. Through limiting my phone use, I was able to have a better mental state and overall be happier.
One of the hardest parts of putting your phone down is feeling like you are missing something important, like a text message from a friend or a post on social media. This feeling can be described as the fear of missing out (FOMO). To avoid FOMO, I recommend limiting your use of social media by setting limitations on your devices. The world is not, in reality, centered on people’s online personalities. It revolves around the real world.
If you have work to do, I would recommend restraining yourself from starting any conversations in text messages with friends. If a conversation is started, you will most likely be unable to forget about the conversation, leading to a cycle of checking your phone for a reply and not getting anything done.
I would also suggest picking up a hobby unrelated to technology. I have had experience with picking up random hobbies like drawing and found them very enjoyable to do. Hobbies and doing work with your hands allow you to escape reality—like technology does but in more meaningful and gratifying ways.
Putting down the phone and focusing on the world around us allows you to truly experience all of life. Instead of using up your time with your phone, making the choice to put the screen away can be a more eye-opening experience than you might anticipate.
The possibilities beyond the screen are endless, and it takes a second to turn off your phone and enjoy those possibilities.

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About the Contributors
PRISCILLA GO ‘26
PRISCILLA GO ‘26, Staff Writer
Priscilla Go is currently a sophomore staff writer for the "Eagle's Eye." Outside of the "Eagle's Eye," she is a proud member of the marching band and indoor percussion, Chinese Culture Club, and STUCO. During her free time, she enjoys playing the piano and guitar, singing, reading, and drawing.
SHRIADITI KANCHERLA ’26
SHRIADITI KANCHERLA ’26, Features Editor
Shriaditi Kancherla is currently a sophomore and an editor for the Features section, and has written for the publication since her freshman year. In addition to the "Eagle's Eye", she is the co-chair for the Rotary club and is a dedicated member of the marching band, DECA, and Peacock Society. During her free time, she enjoys reading, binge-watching Food Network, and singing. She is excited to meet the rest of "The Eagle's Eye" throughout the year!
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