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A Cultural Kaleidoscope

Peacock Society Hosts Annual Diwalit
Students+dance+to+the+DJs+songs+at+Diwalit.
KARINA HAWALDAR ’25
Students dance to the DJ’s songs at Diwalit.

A kaleidoscope is the perfect treasure to describe the EHS Peacock Society’s 2023 Diwalit, an event to celebrate the festival of lights, Diwali. The word “kaleidoscope,” meaning “observer of beautiful forms”, is derived from the Greek word kalos, “beautiful,” and eidos, “shape.” This multicolored item is highly mesmerizing, composed of vibrant colors, produces intricate designs, and relaxes anyone who looks through it.

Such adjectives, used to describe the annual Peacock Society tradition, proves fitting for a holiday representing the spiritual victory of light over darkness. Diwali is typically celebrated with fireworks, new clothes, sweets, and delicious food. Families gather around from all over to celebrate this auspicious day by dancing, eating, and enjoying the fireworks.

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  • (from left to right) Kosha Patel ’24, Anika Prakash ’24, Amber Kapadia ’24, Tulsi Patel ’24, and Yashvi Patel ’24 pose for a photo

  • Students singing together in the middle of the dance circle.

  • Two students sing along while at the top of the crowd.

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The Diwalit theme and celebration proved successful to planners and party goers as tickets were sold out. However, due to such interest, a problem presented itself: Management of people. This was no big feat for diligent board members.

“Managing the people and getting them in was not a problem. We had a system. Board members, including me, were standing in front of the cafeteria taking tickets, checking off names, and giving wristbands,” said Kamya Barot ’25.

Furthermore, the Peacock Society made a decision to allow outsiders which meant that new policies had to be made or adjusted.

“Unlike last year, we established a stricter policy for outsiders as a concern for safety was often brought up. With outsiders, we held onto their IDs in a lock box till the end of the event as a way to avoid people sneaking in and out. Overall, I think it is more than safe to say that this year’s Diwalit was thoroughly planned,” Barot added.

The event was kaleidoscopic and prismatic, meaning that it was colorful, vibrant, and rich. The Peacock Society had turned the EHS cafeteria into a colorful dance floor with lights and beautiful decorations placed all over to illuminate the room. Every attendee’s outfit was multicolored and composed of intricate designs. Men came in kurtas which are long, loose, collarless shirts, while women typically wore lehengas, a form of ankle-length skirts. These traditional clothes were simply elegant and mesmerizing.

On the day of, when we finally saw the decorations up, the DJ’s stand, and the food on the tables, we realized that all our hard work had paid off. We saw our vision in front of us.

— Kamya Barot '25

The board provided a backdrop for pictures to be taken, as well as offered free food and Bollywood music.

The celebration was “cultural, lively, and enjoyable,” said attendee Siya Bhuteja ‘26. According to Bhuteja and other attendees, the samosas (a classical, fried, south-Asian pastry stuffed with a savory mixture of peas, spices, and potatoes) were an absolute delight.

“I enjoyed the songs and liked how English songs were played at the end because many other ethnicities participated,” Reeya Patel ‘27, a freshman at EHS. Patel felt that it helped everyone connect to one another and appreciate each other’s cultures.

Others felt that the music was “outdated” and could have been better.

“The DJs are always a hit or a miss,” according to Bhuteja.

Diwalit, like a Kaleidoscope, was muti-cultural, relaxing, and beautiful. Seeing the Indian culture celebrated by all races, dancing until feet ache, and laughing through the night was definitely the well-accomplished goal of the 2023 Diwalit.

“On the day of, when we finally saw the decorations up, the DJ’s stand, and the food on the tables, we realized that all our hard work had paid off. We saw our vision in front of us.” Barot mentioned.

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About the Contributors
Chaithanyasri Krishnakumar is currently a sophomore at Edison High and a staff writer for the Eagle's Eye. As a writer, she hopes to educate the Edison community about equality and leadership. Outside of being involved in extracurriculars, Chaithanyasri enjoys to run, paint, and swim.
KARINA HAWALDAR ’25, Staff Photographer
Karina is a photographer and staff writer for the EHS Film Club and The Eagle’s Eye. While she has been involved with photography for a few years, she has only been a part of the Film Club since her junior year. Besides photography, she is also a part of the EHS Track & Field team. Outside of EHS, her hobbies include taking pictures (and a love for analog/film photography), drawing, and indulging in true crime documentaries.
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